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seedfescue

Every spring we have to try to convince folks not to seed fescue in spring, but rather wait until fall to overseed. Yes, fescue can germinate if one sows seed in spring in the Carolina area, assuming that a pre-emergent has not been applied earlier in the spring. It may come up and look fine into mid-spring. But as the temperatures rise later, and the humidity increases, many of these tender seedlings may be killed by either brown patch turf disease, or hot weather and drought.

These spring-seeded plants just are not mature enough to withstand the typical stresses that summer can throw out. Compare this to fescue that was seeded up to 6 months ago the previous fall. This turf is mature by the time the summer heat and humidity hits, with a stronger root system that can absorb soil moisture better.

And if a homowner wants to do spring seeding, then applying a pre-emergent in the spring cannot be done, so you’ll have more weeds to deal with. Therefore, we enourage folks that if they really need turf in an area in spring, consider sodding it, although it’s more expensive than seeding. If you can wait about 6 months, then September and early October are much better times for long-term success with fescue seeding.

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